24 September 2015

Negotiating rubrics

In our first unit of the school year in Grade 4B at KIST, the Summative Assessment Task was to prepare a proposal for an exploratory expedition.

One of my favorite informal formative assessments is to empower students to collaborate to create the success criteria for each of the rubric categories. I simply distribute blank rubrics and provide time for them to discuss and fill in the charts to continue a practice that I introduced in the post Student-created rubrics and have found to be effective in many ways.


As they deliberate, I circulate throughout the room listening for opportunities to clarify or guide discussions to higher orders of thinking. By nature, this activity practices Evaluation, but students' discussions do not always reach that goal without help.

By engaging with the language of the unit, especially the Key Concepts, the students complete a formative self assessment of their understanding, even if they are not fully aware of what they are doing.

Finally, on a version projected at the front of the room, we negotiate and build the final draft using the work students have already completed in their groups.

An added bonus is that my evaluations according to the rubric are, and more importantly are perceived to be exceptionally fair. Because they are intimately familiar with the language in the rubric, my feedback is understandable and meaningful.

10 September 2015

Designing a new classroom

Upon arriving for the first day of a new job, I sat by myself, for the first time in my new classroom, Grade 4B, in my new school, K International School Tokyo.

In anticipation of that moment, I applied attention to classroom environment as a crucial element of Learning Experience Design. Several interesting articles have been published recently on this topic, including Classroom design can boost primary pupils' progress by 16% and The Perfect Classroom, According to Science.

While following CISC 2015 - the most inspiring symposium I didn't attend, I was inspired by a classroom layout concept shared by Brian Curwick.

It closely resembled my own thinking about the importance of collaborative teams in learning. I augmented this idea with the need for a balance between private, collaborative, and presentation spaces.


Empowering pedagogy


Last April, I was pleasantly surprised by this tweet announcing a twitter chat on the topic of environment in empowering pedagogy:
The document shared in the tweet, 'The Environment' (Chapter 8 of Empowering Pedagogy For Early Childhood Education), and Making Your Environment 'The Third Teacher', another article shared within it, have both been enlightening as during my deliberations.

The graphic below from 'The Environment' is an ideal reference in this process.




Also included was a quote which resonated strongly with me:

'The path of learning and development is more like a butterfly than that of a bullet.' Jim Greenman

Learning shouldn't have a trajectory, but rather a heading.